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04.11.2013

Neues Album "Swing Both Ways": Robbie Williams covert den Song "Puttin On The Ritz"

Robbie Williams, Neues Album Swing Both Ways: Robbie Williams covert den Song Puttin On The Ritz

"'Puttin' On The Ritz' ist genau so, wie ein Swing-Song sein sollte", schwärmt Robbie Williams. Kein Wunder also, dass der smarte Entertainer unbedingt eine ganz eigene Version dieses Klassikers auf seinem für den 15. November angekündigten neuen Album "Swing Both Ways" haben wollte. "Puttin' On The Ritz" wurde ursprünglich von Irving Berlin im Jahre 1929 für das Broadway Theater geschrieben. Seitdem sind zahlreiche Cover-Versionen des Songs erschienen, unter anderem von Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald und nun auch von Robbie Williams. 

Robbie Williams covert "Puttin' On The Ritz" auf dem neuen Album "Swing Both Ways"

Der Swing-Klassiker zählt schon seit Robbies Kindheit zu seinen Lieblingssongs: "Ich habe es zu ersten Mal in Mel Brooks Film 'Young Frankenstein' gehört. Der Film brachte mich immer zum Lachen als Kind - und das brachte meinen Vater zum Lachen", erinnert er sich. Die "Puttin' On The Ritz" Version von Fred Astaire hat es Robbie Williams besonders angetan: "Ich habe versucht genauso gut zu singen wie Fred Astaire." Ob er sogar noch besser klingt, erfahren wir am 15. November. 

>>> Stimmt euch hier mit zahlreichen Videos von Robbie Williams aufs neue Album ein

uttin' On The Ritz: the definitive Swing song, the archetypal embodiment of 1940s silver screen showmanship, vitality and pizazz.

"I think if you distilled what a swing album should be", Robbie says, "it would sound like Puttin' On The Ritz."

The song was originally written in 1929 by legendary Broadway theatre impresario and songwriter Irving Berlin - who also wrote hits including White Christmas and There's No Business Like Show Business - and has been covered by superstars the world over ever since, including Clark Gable, Benny Goodman and Ella Fitzgerald.

But there's only one version by one particular Hollywood superstar which stands out for Robbie — someone he feels he shares a special affinity with. "Famously Fred Astaire, who I think recorded the definitive version, once went for an audition and they said ‘can’t act, can’t sing, can dance a bit’. Similar accusations have been levelled against me too, so I just tried to sing it as least as well as Fred Astaire."

Puttin' On The Ritz is yet another childhood favourite of Robbie's which he chose to cover on Swings Both Ways, inspired by a movie scene which proved an endless source of entertainment and wonder.

"I think I heard it for the first time in the Mel Brooks film Young Frankenstein - it used to make me laugh as a kid, and I knew that it made my dad laugh. I later learned that the original wasn’t sung by a man in a Frankenstein outfit!"


Read more at http://www.robbiewilliams.com/news-blogs/introducing-puttin-ritz#XhpD3m545gZYXHTk.99 uttin' On The Ritz: the definitive Swing song, the archetypal embodiment of 1940s silver screen showmanship, vitality and pizazz. "I think if you distilled what a swing album should be", Robbie says, "it would sound like Puttin' On The Ritz." The song was originally written in 1929 by legendary Broadway theatre impresario and songwriter Irving Berlin - who also wrote hits including White Christmas and There's No Business Like Show Business - and has been covered by superstars the world over ever since, including Clark Gable, Benny Goodman and Ella Fitzgerald. But there's only one version by one particular Hollywood superstar which stands out for Robbie — someone he feels he shares a special affinity with. "Famously Fred Astaire, who I think recorded the definitive version, once went for an audition and they said ‘can’t act, can’t sing, can dance a bit’. Similar accusations have been levelled against me too, so I just tried to sing it as least as well as Fred Astaire." Puttin' On The Ritz is yet another childhood favourite of Robbie's which he chose to cover on Swings Both Ways, inspired by a movie scene which proved an endless source of entertainment and wonder. "I think I heard it for the first time in the Mel Brooks film Young Frankenstein - it used to make me laugh as a kid, and I knew that it made my dad laugh. I later learned that the original wasn’t sung by a man in a Frankenstein outfit!" Read more at http://www.robbiewilliams.com/news-blogs/introducing-puttin-ritz#XhpD3m545gZYXHTk.99 uttin' On The Ritz: the definitive Swing song, the archetypal embodiment of 1940s silver screen showmanship, vitality and pizazz. "I think if you distilled what a swing album should be", Robbie says, "it would sound like Puttin' On The Ritz." The song was originally written in 1929 by legendary Broadway theatre impresario and songwriter Irving Berlin - who also wrote hits including White Christmas and There's No Business Like Show Business - and has been covered by superstars the world over ever since, including Clark Gable, Benny Goodman and Ella Fitzgerald. But there's only one version by one particular Hollywood superstar which stands out for Robbie — someone he feels he shares a special affinity with. "Famously Fred Astaire, who I think recorded the definitive version, once went for an audition and they said ‘can’t act, can’t sing, can dance a bit’. Similar accusations have been levelled against me too, so I just tried to sing it as least as well as Fred Astaire." Puttin' On The Ritz is yet another childhood favourite of Robbie's which he chose to cover on Swings Both Ways, inspired by a movie scene which proved an endless source of entertainment and wonder. "I think I heard it for the first time in the Mel Brooks film Young Frankenstein - it used to make me laugh as a kid, and I knew that it made my dad laugh. I later learned that the original wasn’t sung by a man in a Frankenstein outfit!" Read more at http://www.robbiewilliams.com/news-blogs/introducing-puttin-ritz#XhpD3m545gZYXHTk.99

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